BEST PAPER AWARDS

The conference in December was a great success, with high-quality and interesting presentations from experts in the field. The special atmosphere of the event created an environment of intensive learning and collaboration. Attendees were able to network with each other and gain valuable insights into the latest developments in their respective fields.

Congratulations to all the winners of the conference for their hard work and dedication. It is a great achievement to have made it through the competition and be recognized for their efforts. We also want to thank all the participants who took part in this conference and wish them luck for the next one.

Best Ph.D. Student paper

Hagay Volvovsky, MIT

Collaborating at the Tower of Babel: The Meaning of Cooperation and the Foundations of Long-Term Exchange Hagay Volvovsky, MIT

Best Entrepreneurship and Innovation papers

1st Place

Serendipity in Science

Russell Funk, University of Minnesota

Raviv Murciano-Goroff, Boston University

Pyung (Joe) Nahm, University of Minnesota

Michael Park, University of Minnesota

2nd Place

Technology Adoption and Innovation: The Establishment of Airmail and Aviation Innovation in the United States, 1918-1935

Eunhee Sohn, Georgia Institute of Technology

Robert Seamans, New York University

Daniel Sands, University College London

3rd Place

Keep Your Friends Close and Your Enemies Closer?: The Impact of Accelerator Cohort Composition on Startup Outcomes
Charles Eesley, Stanford University

Charles Eesley, Stanford University

JungYun Han, National Taiwan University

Best Strategy papers

1st Place

The Need for Speed: The Impact of Capital Constraints on Strategic Misconduct

Christopher F. Eaglin, Duke University

2nd Place

Doing Organizational Identity: Earnings Surprises and the Performative Atypicality Premium

Paul Gouvard, Università della Svizzera italiana

Amir Goldberg, Stanford University

Sammer B. Srivastava, University of California, Berkeley

3rd Place

Standing on the Shoulders of (Male) Giants: Gender Inequality and the Technological Impact of Scientific Ideas

Michaël Bikard, INSEAD

Isabel Fernandez-Mateo, London Business School